Tower in Trongsa


“I’m returning after 48 years!” exclaimed Dr Jagar Dorji, MP.

The Ta Dzong, which was constructed more than 350 years ago as a watch tower above Trongsa Dzong, was used a as a make-shift dormitory for students of Chokorling School in 1961. Dr Jagar was among the 13 students who lived in Ta Dzong for a year.

We were in attendance when His Majesty the King inaugurated the Ta Dzong as the Tower of Trongsa Museum on 10 December. The conversion of the dzong to a state-of-the-art museum took over three years and Nu 120 million. That’s a lot of money, but well worth it.

Worth it because the Tower of Trongsa shows off our history and heritage, and art and culture magnificently. Well worth it because the museum will attract tourists and much needed jobs to Trongsa.

I asked Dr Jagar what he thought of the conversion of Ta Dzong. “Nice, very nice”, he beamed. Naturally. He hails from Trongsa.

The Tower marks the completion of three interrelated projects assisted by the Government of Austria. Through the projects the Trongsa Dzong was partly renovated, the historical baa zam (traditional cantilever wooden bridge) across the Mangde-chu was rebuilt, and the Ta Dzong was converted to a world class museum.

The projects have finally made Trongsa a tourist destination. And that will allow the local economy to grow while also promoting our rich culture and heritage. Such projects must be encouraged.

Well done.

 

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  1. Of course, any activity which encourages national pride and cultural identity is too be supported.

    However, a few questions arise about the way the project was managed technically. I know that those without cultural and engineering expertise were providing ‘mandatory input’ to the DES about the construction – specifically the corners of the zam towers. If you look carefully at historical photos of this bridge and other traditional structures you will find they have ‘sharp’ corners if not totally right angles. However, the zam towers have chamfered corners! How did Austrian technical expertise extend to such details? what else have the influenced wrongly

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