Tweeting

Real twitters

Real twitters

I’ve now been blogging for more than six months. And I’ve started receiving good feedback. During the weekdays we easily get four to five thousand hits. And, increasingly, many of the readers offer valuable comments. So, overall, I’m quite satisfied.

But to enhance my interaction with friends, especially those in Bhutan, I’ve also been on Facebook, a free social networking site, for a while now. Please join me here.

And to expand the blogging experience I’ve been experimenting with Twitter, also a free social networking site, but one that specializes in microblogging. Twitter users post updates, called “tweets”,which are entries less than 140 characters long, and which are available to their “followers”. To sign up and follow me, go here.

Now here’s the interesting part: if B-Mobile, say, were to allow Twitter to recognize their network, then users would be able to “tweet” using SMS’s, and “followers” would be able to receive updates as SMS’s. And that would be really handy.

Twikini_Theme_Windows

Twikini screenshot

I tweet on a smart phone, a Sony Ericsson Xi which runs on Windows Mobile 6.1. And I find it very convenient to post updates using Twikini, an application that allows you to use Twitter easily and quickly on your mobile phone. If you’re on 3G, I recommend Twikini to manage your Twitter account.

So why am I writing about Twitter, tweeting and Twikini? Because I wish to invite you to try out this very effective networking site that has taken most countries by storm. More importantly, I wish to inform you that I’ve decided to tweet regularly during the third National Assembly session.

Now for the birds, the real twitters pictured at the beginning of this post. These two birds have decided, very kindly, to roost outside our home in Taba. The picture shows the female bird carefully emerging from their nest (the horizontal member, made from bamboo, of my daughter’s swing) while her partner guards their territory.

The birds are Russet Sparrows. You’ve seen them. They’re plenty of them in Bhutan. But Yeshey Dorji, one of Bhutan’s foremost birders, tells me that they are very rare in other parts of the world.